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Safety Guidelines

The Freeride Project’s aim is to encourage as many people as possible to participate in extreme sporting activities. These aims, however, must be achieved within a safe and healthy environment. Although no activity can be made completely risk free, high levels of injury to participants can be reduce by following simple safety guidelines.

The Freeride Project locations are the places that have been reviewed by either the Freeride Project team or its members. It is not possible for the Freeride Project’s team to risk assess all these places individually therefore it is important that you follow these key safety guidelines when visiting a reviewed location and or while reviewing a location. It is important to remember that all the different sports and locations have their own unique inherent risks and dangers.

Ask yourself the questions

What sport am I intending to take part in?

What protective equipment do I need?

Is this a suitable location for my ability?

What’s the weather going to be like?

If you don’t know, don’t go

When at the location run through the three main stages of a risk assessment

  1. Identify the hazards/risk factors and control measures
  2. Assess the risks
  3. Record the results of the assessment

Never go alone, let people know when you are going and when you are expected to be back. Wear appropriate protective equipment; helmet, knees pads, elbow pads, wrist pads, back pad, gum shield, goggles, safety harness, safety lines, each sport will require specific equipment, if you are unsure ask an industry professional

Warm-Up – Extreme sports are intense and often use fast muscle responses, look after yourself, ensure a proper warm-up and cool-down reducing the chance of injury.

Make sure you are physically and medically capable to participate in your chosen sport

Ensure you have enough food and water to last the duration of the activity

Warm-Up – Extreme sports are intense and often use fast muscle responses, look after yourself, ensure a proper warm-up and cool-down reducing the chance of injury.

It’s also a good idea to get certified in first aid and CPR, learn the signs and symptoms of a concussion and help avoid overuse injury by resting.